Horatius Bonar

Horatius Bonar (1808-1889).

Horatius Bonar (1808-1889).

Horatius Bonar was born at Edinburgh, in 1808. His education was obtained at the High School, and the University of his native city. He was ordained to the ministry, in 1837, and since then has been pastor at Kelso. In 1843, he joined the Free Church of Scotland. His reputation as a religious writer was first gained on the publication of the “Kelso Tracts,” of which he was the author. He has also written many other prose works, some of which have had a very large circulation. Nor is he less favorably known as a religious poet and hymn-writer. The three series of “Hymns of Faith and Hope,” have passed through several editions.
~ Annotations of the Hymnal, Charles Hutchins, M.A. 1872


Bonar, Horatius, D.D. Dr. Bonar’s family has had representatives among the clergy of the Church of Scotland during two centuries and more. His father, James Bonar, second Solicitor of Excise in Edinburgh, was a man of intellectual power, varied learning, and deop piety.

Horatius Bonar was born in Edinburgh, Dec. 19th, 1808; and educated at the High School and the University of Edinburgh. After completing his studies, he was “licensed” to preach, and became assistant to the Rev. John Lewis, minister of St. James’s, Leith. He was ordained minister of the North Parish, Kelso, on the 30th November, 1837, but left the Established Church at the “Disruption,” in May, 1848, remaining in Kelso as a minister of the Free Church of Scotland. The University of Aberdeen conferred on him the doctorate of divinity in 1853. In 1866 he was translated to the Chalmers Memorial Church, the Grange, Edinburgh; and in 1883 he was chosen Moderator of the General Assembly of of the Free Church of Scotland.

In Great Britain and America nearly 100 of Dr. Bonar’s hymns are in common use. They are found in almost all modern hymnals from four in Hymns Ancient & Modern to more than twenty in the American Songs for the Sanctuary, N. Y., 1865-72. The most widely known are, “A few more years shall roll;” “Come, Lord, and tarry not;” “Here, O my Lord, I see Thee face to face;” “I heard the Voice of Jesus say;” “The Church has waited long;” and “Thy way, not mine, O Lord.”

www.hymnary.org

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