January 27

SERVANTS of God! or sons
Shall I not call you? Because
Not as servants ye knew
Your Father’s innermost mind,
His, who unwillingly sees
One of His little ones lost—
Yours is the praise, if mankind
Hath not as yet in its march
Fainted, and fallen, and died!
Matthew Arnold


AND do not be offended at my telling you the truth: for the truth is, that no man who goes to war with you or any other multitude, honestly striving against the many lawless and unrighteous deeds which are done in a State, will save his life; he who will fight for the right, if he would live even for a brief space, must have a private station and not a public one.
Socrates (to his Judges)


A SAINT’S life in one man may be less than common honesty in another. From us, whose consciences He has reached and enlightened, God may look for a martyr’s truth, a Christian’s unworldly simplicity, before He will place us on a level even with the average of the exposed classes. We perhaps think our lives at least harmless. We do not consider what He may think of them, when compared with the invitations of His that we have slighted, with the aims of His Providence we are leaving without our help, with the glory for ourselves we are refusing and casting away, with the vast sum of blessed work that daily faithfulness in time can rear without overwork on any single day.
John H. Thom

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October 30

HE who hath watched, not shared the strife,
Knows how the day hath gone.
He only lives with the world’s life,
Who hath renounced his own.
Matthew Arnold


THE real corrupters of society may be, not the corrupt, but those who have held back the righteous leaven, the salt that has lost its savour, the innocent who have not even the moral courage to show what they think of the effrontery of impurity,—the serious, who yet timidly succumb before some loud-voiced scoffer,—the heart trembling all over with religious sensibilities that yet suffers itself through false shame to be beaten down into outward and practical acquiescence by some rude and worldly nature.
John H. Thom


WHAT are great gifts but the correlative of great work? We are not born for ourselves, but for our kind, for our neighbours, for our country; it is but selfishness, indolence, a perverse fastidiousness, an unmanliness, and no virtue or praise to bury our talent in a napkin.
John H. Newman

October 10

THE help in strife,
The thousand sweet, still joys of such
As hand in hand face earthly life.
Matthew Arnold


THE spirit of Love must work the works, and speak the tones, of Love. It cannot exist and give no sign, or a false sign. It cannot be a spirit of Love, and mantle into irritable and selfish impatience. It cannot be a spirit of Love, and at the same time make self the prominent object. It cannot rejoice to lend itself to the happiness of others, and at the same time be seeking its own. It cannot be generous, and envious. It cannot be sympathizing, and unseemly; self-forgetful, and vain-glorious. It cannot delight in the rectitude and purity of other hearts, as the spiritual elements of their peace, and yet unnecessarily suspect them.
John H. Thom


BUT in Christian life every moment and every act is an opportunity for doing the one thing of becoming Christ-like. Every day is full of a most impressive experience. Every temptation to evil temper which can assail us to-day will be an opportunity to decide the question whether we shall gain the calmness and the rest of Christ, or whether we shall be tossed by the restlessness and agitation of the world.
Frederick W. Robertson